NCAA Acknowledges $13.5 Million Tournament Budget Gap

NCAA Acknowledges $13.5 Million Tournament Budget Gap

NCAA Acknowledges $13.5 Million Tournament Budget Gap

NCAA Acknowledges $13.5 Million Tournament Budget Gap

Fortner has been among the coaches who criticized the N.C.A.A. for its management of this year’s tournaments. The N.C.A.A. apologized for some disparities between the competitions — it also acknowledged differences in coronavirus testing protocols, which it insisted local health officials had approved — and made rapid changes to improve workout options.

The N.C.A.A. announced Thursday that it had hired Roberta A. Kaplan, a prominent civil rights lawyer, to conduct a review of its championship events. Kaplan is expected to release a report this summer, and Mark Emmert, the N.C.A.A. president, said that officials would be “evaluating the current and previous resource allocation to each championship.”

Gloria Nevarez, the commissioner of the West Coast Conference, said she understood the financial demands of holding large events, but she also said the N.C.A.A. had been “overdue for a holistic look” at spending around its championships.

“A lot of our campuses and our conferences operate by providing equity and really have that in mind,” said Nevarez, whose league includes Brigham Young and Gonzaga. “It’s my hope that the N.C.A.A. reflects those operations.”

Although the N.C.A.A. is a nonprofit with executives who routinely cite the “public trust” of college athletics, the association is not subject to open records laws, as many of its member schools are, and its finances are often opaque, even to many conference commissioners and athletic directors. The N.C.A.A. annually releases audited financial statements, with revenues and expenses listed in sweeping categories, and its tax return is eventually made public.

The N.C.A.A. did not provide specific financial records to support the assertions in the championship financial summary it prepared.

In audited statements, the N.C.A.A. reported more than $1.1 billion in revenues for its 2019 fiscal year, the last budget cycle before the pandemic took hold. That year, the N.C.A.A. said it spent almost $154 million on “Division I championships, programs and N.I.T. tournaments.”


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