How Much Watching Time Do You Have This Weekend?

How Much Watching Time Do You Have This Weekend?

Want more recommendations on what to watch? Sign up for our Watching newsletter to have them delivered straight to your inbox.

‘Harley Quinn’

When to watch: Now, on DC Universe.

This irreverent, adult take on Gotham had a fantastic first season that started late last year. Now Season 2, which starts Friday, is here with more tales of violence and chaos, but told with a brash brightness that adds both silliness and genuine depth. The show is reminiscent of a naughty “30 Rock” or “Community” — creative and surprising, with episodes that satirize their own genre from within. If you feel you’ve watched all the usual TV suspects and are a little tired of everything, try this.

‘High Maintenance’

When to watch: Friday at 11 p.m., on HBO.

The Hallmark Channel has been airing its cornball holiday fare under the title “we need a little Christmas” for comfort during our pandemic. If you find that setting appealing but not that content, watch “High Maintenance” instead. On the season finale this week, it’s Christmas and Hanukkah, and a snowstorm forces everyone, including “the guy” (played by Ben Sinclair), to stay in the city. This show’s thoughtful melancholy feels particularly apt right now, its understanding of collective loneliness prescient but weirdly reassuring.

‘Friday Night Lights’

When to watch: Now, on Hulu, or free on IMDb TV.

If you haven’t been back to Dillon in a while, or if you’ve never experienced the emotional potency of one of the best domestic dramas ever, now’s the time. The show is set within the world of Texas high school football, but you don’t need to care about football at all. Good dramas have big central questions: Who am I? What is justice? Is love real? and so on. The central question of “Friday Night Lights” is What is a team?, and it explores that with sports, yes, but also with marriages, families, friendships, you name it. It also has one of my favorite pilots, and the performances (particularly from Kyle Chandler and Connie Britton) are so good you forget the show is pretend.


Source link

Check Also

A Wild, Caustic Satire Packed With the Absurd

A Wild, Caustic Satire Packed With the Absurd

A Wild, Caustic Satire Packed With the Absurd A Wild, Caustic Satire Packed With the …