12 New Books We Recommend This Week

12 New Books We Recommend This Week

THE UNDOCUMENTED AMERICANS, by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio. (One World, $26.) Cornejo Villavicencio was one of the first undocumented students to be accepted into Harvard University. In her captivating and evocative first book, she tells “the full story” of what that means — relying not just on her own experience but on interviews with immigrants across the United States. “Over about a decade of sporadic reporting, Cornejo Villavicencio traveled the country, gaining access to vigilantly guarded communities whose stories are largely absent from modern journalism and literature,” Caitlin Dickerson writes in her review. “Particularly in her depictions of immigrant women, Cornejo Villavicencio reveals a fullness of character that feels subversive, simply because of how rare it is.”

THINKING INSIDE THE BOX: Adventures With Crosswords and the Puzzling People Who Can’t Live Without Them, by Adrienne Raphel. (Penguin Press, $27.) This cultural and personal history of crossword puzzles and their fans, written by an aficionado who argues that “it’s hard to imagine modern life without the crossword,” is diverting, informative and discursive. “Raphel proves a skilled cultural historian, dipping into newspaper archives and movie reels and private correspondence to describe how the crossword came to conquer the world,” Peter Sagal writes in his review. “Like a good crossword, her book challenges us to back away from our assumptions, allows us to think differently and apply ourselves again.”

POSTCOLONIAL LOVE POEM: Poems, by Natalie Diaz. (Graywolf, paper, $16.) Diaz claims the love poem — its imagery, its language — and makes it her own, centering the experiences of queer women of color in lush lines that address love, sex, desire and, always, politics. “From the hips of a beloved to a game of reservation basketball, from the endangered Colorado River to her branching literary heritages, Diaz catalogs the things that connect her to her body and her art, her languages and her cultures,” Emilia Phillips writes in her review. “Diaz’s collection is no doubt one of the most important poetry releases in years, one to applaud for its considerable demonstration of skill, its resistance to dominant perspectives and its light wrought of desire.”

LADY IN WAITING: My Extraordinary Life in the Shadow of the Crown, by Anne Glenconner. (Hachette, $28.) The author spent decades as a lady-in-waiting to the difficult Princess Margaret, but those who open this memoir seeking gossip about the British royals will instead find sharp revelations about the ups and downs of aristocratic life. “Despite its madcap romps, ‘Lady in Waiting’ can make for sobering reading, and the downside of this privileged life, with its potential for tragedy, looms,” Alida Becker writes in her review. “Glenconner’s descriptions of these difficult times are evidence of the grit that underlies her genteel affect.”

WE RIDE UPON STICKS, by Quan Barry. (Pantheon, $26.95.) In her second novel, Barry ventures into virgin territory — literally. Her story of female sexuality, friendship, racial identity, witchcraft and transformation centers on a field hockey team in Danvers, Mass., in the 1980s. “Barry writes with a sustained, manic energy,” Marcy Dermansky says in her review. “‘We Ride Upon Sticks’ is quirky, comic and painstakingly detailed. Every field hockey game has its own story, every player comes with both a back story and a revelation. The plot tackles racial identity and gender identity; by the novel’s conclusion, the team seems to have explored it all.”

THE STORY OF MORE: How We Got to Climate Change and Where to Go From Here, by Hope Jahren. (Vintage, paper, $15.) The author of the memoir “Lab Girl” offers a broad environmental argument that we need to change our habit of “making things for the purpose of discarding them” if we hope to solve the problem of climate change. “She leads us on a journey across time and space, outlining thoughts and beliefs from Mesopotamia to her tiny Minnesota hometown,” Kendra Pierre-Louis writes, reviewing the book alongside two other looks at climate science. “It’s an argument that contrasts with the recent spate of climate books, which opt to pummel readers with facts and guilt. Jahren … instead writes delicately, like the whispery scrape of a skate tracing a figure on the ice.”


Source link

Check Also

5 Things to Do This Weekend

5 Things to Do This Weekend

5 Things to Do This Weekend 5 Things to Do This Weekend Why did so …